News – UAF news and information http://news.uaf.edu UAF news and information Fri, 27 May 2016 22:16:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Alaska scientist receives $1.6 million award for vaccine research http://news.uaf.edu/alaska-scientist-receives-1-6m-vaccine-research-award/ http://news.uaf.edu/alaska-scientist-receives-1-6m-vaccine-research-award/#respond Fri, 27 May 2016 22:10:51 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65446
Photo courtesy of Andrea Ferrante
Dr. Andrea Ferrante, a UAF immunologist, received a $1.6 million award from the National Institutes of Health to study the molecular processes governing how vaccines work.

A treatment credited with saving about nine million lives a year worldwide and bringing major human diseases including smallpox, tetanus, whooping cough and polio under some degree of control is said to have begun about 200 years ago with a milkmaid, a boy, a cow and a doctor.

Yet in all that time, the details of how the treatment actually works are still unclear.

Dr. Andrea Ferrante, a University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist, hopes to change that. Ferrante received a $1.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the specific molecular processes that govern how vaccines do what they do, with an eye toward creating safer and more effective disease-specific vaccines.

As the story goes, an English milkmaid told physician Edward Jenner that she would never get smallpox — a deadly disease and a leading cause of blindness — because she had had cowpox, a mild, uncommon illness in cattle that can spread to humans through sores on a cow’s udder.

The milkmaid’s reasoning — that infection with cowpox protected her from smallpox — was a common belief among dairy workers, and Jenner is said to have tested their theory by doing something then that would never be allowed today.

Taking pus from a cowpox sore on the hand of a milkmaid, he put it into a scratch on the arm of a boy. Although the boy felt poorly for several days, he made a full recovery.

Next, Jenner took pus from a human smallpox sore and put that into the boy’s arm. Just as the dairy workers would have predicted, the boy did not contract smallpox. The doctor repeated his test on more people and the results were always the same — they did not get sick. Jenner didn’t know how infection or inoculation with cowpox prevented people from getting small pox; he knew only that it did.

The veracity of the milkmaid story aside, all vaccines developed since that time stem from similar observations that inoculation appears to confer resistance to infection.

“Neither Jonas Salk nor Albert Sabin, who developed polio vaccines, had a precise understanding of how those vaccines worked; they just knew that patients administered with the vaccine they developed had a far smaller chance of getting sick,” said Ferrante, an immunologist at the UAF Institute of Arctic Biology and College of Natural Science and Mathematics.

To understand what Ferrante is studying and how vaccines work, it is helpful to look at how the human body fights illnesses. When germs such as bacteria or viruses enter a body and multiply, they cause an infection. Among the “tools” the body uses to fight infections are special white blood cells called dendritic cells, which “swallow” and digest germs.

Bits of protein from the digested germ are pushed to the outer surface of the dendritic cell and attach to “docking stations,” where they attract another kind of special white blood cell called T-cells.

“Scientists have very little understanding of how the dendritic cells ‘decide’ which bits of a digested germ to push out and expose on their outer surface,” said Ferrante. “We know that the immune system responds, but we don’t know exactly why.”

It is the attraction between those bits of germ proteins and the special T-cells that triggers a person’s immune system response. And it is the body’s “memory” of that response that enables the immune system to act faster and more robustly to specific germs in future infections.

“Vaccines simulate what happens during a normal infection, with the dendritic cells showing bits of weakened germs to T-cells, just without the fuss of getting sick,” said Ferrante. “Thus it generates a memory that the immune system uses when the real germ comes along. It is like training the system to recognize the undesired guest.”

Using test tubes, not people, Ferrante, two doctoral candidates and two undergraduate students are designing experiments in which they change the cellular environment of dendritic cells to answer their questions.

“We want to be able to identify whether it is pH or enzymes or something else that controls which bits of digested protein are exposed and therefore whether there’s an immune response,” said Ferrante. “A significant number of infections like those from Ebola and Zika viruses have yet to be restrained by immunization, and understanding this mechanism may enable more targeted and effective vaccine preparations for such illnesses.”

ADDITIONAL CONTACTS: Andrea Ferrante, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, aferrante@alaska.edu, 907-474-5916.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under award number R01AI118888. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

 

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Moose flies are a high-summer Alaska pest http://news.uaf.edu/moose-flies-high-summer-alaska-pest/ http://news.uaf.edu/moose-flies-high-summer-alaska-pest/#respond Thu, 26 May 2016 19:56:47 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65486 A “moose fly” on the upper Tanana River. Photo by Ned Rozell.While boating down the Yukon River during the hottest summer recorded in Alaska (1915, when Fort Yukon reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit), missionary Hudson Stuck wrote about the wildlife that most bothered his party. “With the failure of a little breeze and the overcasting of the sky, the weather grows oppressively sultry and a swarm of horse-flies, or moose-flies as they are called in these parts, makes appearance — large venomous insects that bite a piece out of one’s flesh when they alight.”]]> A “moose fly” on the upper Tanana River. Photo by Ned Rozell.

 

<i>Photo by Ned Rozell</i><br>A “moose fly” on the upper Tanana River.
Photo by Ned Rozell
A “moose fly” on the upper Tanana River.

While boating down the Yukon River during the hottest summer recorded in Alaska (1915, when Fort Yukon reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit), missionary Hudson Stuck wrote about the wildlife that most bothered his party.

“With the failure of a little breeze and the overcasting of the sky, the weather grows oppressively sultry and a swarm of horse-flies, or moose-flies as they are called in these parts, makes appearance — large venomous insects that bite a piece out of one’s flesh when they alight.”

A century later, the helmeted flies almost the size of a moose nugget maintain a healthy presence along Alaska’s waterways. The flies from the family Tabanidae (called horse and deer flies in other places) drive moose to gallops of terror. The big flies seek mammals, including you, for meals of blood that allow them to produce more flies.

The creatures are stout enough to absorb the smack of a palm and then fly away. With evolved stealth, they feather-land on skin. Soon after, the victim feels the pierce of a needle many times worse than a mosquito bite. Horse and deer-fly expert James Goodwin of Jarvis Christian College in Texas explains: “The female’s mouthparts include two pairs of cutting blades,” he wrote in an email. “A female literally chews or cuts through the skin with these blades, creating a wound that serves as a pool which fills up with blood.”

If left unmolested — which almost never happens when a fly slices a human — the fly laps blood until its abdomen is about to burst. Biologist J.L. Webb, on assignment to study horse flies in California and Nevada in the 1920s, pulled out his stopwatch when he witnessed a fly on a “perfectly calm” cow. “The fly fed to apparent satiety in 11 minutes and 10 seconds,” Webb reported.

As is the case with mosquitoes and other biting flies that have prevented humans from overpopulating Alaska, the females are the ones to fear. The adult males have no flesh-cutting apparatus, surviving on a diet of nectar and pollen. From an evolutionary perspective, it’s hard to fault the females in their quest for protein-rich meals. We are warm, slow-moving and contain the nectar of life.

Sensors on the flies’ large heads detect the carbon dioxide we emit and the heat of our bodies, along with our clothing and silhouettes and other features that make us stand out from the alder bushes. Their multicolored compound eyes sometimes feature bold stripes, which may be how males and females of the same species recognize one another.

Thirty to 40 different species of the giant flies buzz the air of Alaska, some of them the same type that harass cattle and horses in Texas. The winged adults only live three or four weeks here, just as they do down south. Entomologists have found the big flies everywhere on the planet except Hawaii, Greenland and Iceland.

And, while everyone in more southern places calls them horse flies, Hudson Stuck wrote that moose fly is a much better fit for the Alaska version.

“Here we are annoyed by them almost beyond endurance,” he wrote on his sweltering river trip of a century ago. “And not a horse within 100 miles.”

Since the late 1970s, the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute has provided this column free in cooperation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer for the Geophysical Institute. A version of this column appeared in 2012.

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A village in a lab: UAF works to advance energy industry http://news.uaf.edu/village-lab-uaf-works-advance-energy-industry/ http://news.uaf.edu/village-lab-uaf-works-advance-energy-industry/#respond Thu, 26 May 2016 00:47:56 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65444 David_LightThe first thing you notice upon entering the 5,000-square-foot Energy Technology Facility located on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus is the bright blue UAF-colored floor and the orderliness of everything inside. All four bays of the world-class energy lab are dedicated to the design and development of practical, cost-effective and innovative energy solutions for Alaska.]]> David_Light
PIS_overhead
UAF photo by Todd Paris
An overhead view of ACEP’s Power Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Technology Facility.

The first thing you notice upon entering the 5,000-square-foot Energy Technology Facility located on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus is the bright blue UAF-colored floor and the orderliness of everything inside. All four bays of the world-class energy lab are dedicated to the design and development of practical, cost-effective and innovative energy solutions for Alaska.

The efficiency and effectiveness of the space is a testament to the hours of hard work and years of field experience on the part of the laboratory manager, David Light, and a robust team of researchers working for the Alaska Center for Energy and Power.

Light’s expertise is most evident inside the middle bays of the facility, where the Power Systems Integration Laboratory is located. The PSI lab is designed to operate on the same scale as a typical rural Alaska village power system and can be modified for multiple testing scenarios. Through several years of concentrated teamwork (and with the help of a 5-ton overhead crane), the lab was transformed from an empty test space in 2011 into a state-of-the-art microgrid testing environment. Its equipment includes a cutting-edge inverter, a 320 kilowatt generator, a high-resolution data acquisition system and more.

David_Light
UAF photo by Todd Paris
Alaska Center for Energy and Power researcher David Light.

This year, the PSI lab is adding two more emulators — devices that mimic the behavior of energy systems. (The lab already has a wind turbine emulator.)

The new solar photovoltaic emulator is a direct-current power source allowing researchers to model the effects of sudden drops or rises in electricity created by a solar panel array in a microgrid environment, such as found in an Alaska village.

“This will be online very shortly, and will enable us to provide a realistic solar resource for use in our research,” Light said.

Just outside the facility sits an imposing steel structure awaiting the arrival of the next lab addition, a specially designed electrical fault emulator. This fault emulator will allow ACEP researchers to create electrical faults, typically dangerous and damaging events, in a controlled environment in order to collect data on the effects of faults in isolated electrical grids. The fault emulator is under construction, with completion scheduled by late summer, Light said.

PV_emulator
UAF/ACEP photo by Max Frey
The solar photovoltaic emulator at ACEP’s Power Systems Integration Laboratory.

The research results produced by ACEP’s PSI lab are providing crucial information to managers of rural Alaska communities as well as the quickly growing, billion-dollar microgrid industry that supports them. Clay Koplin, the CEO of Cordova Electric Cooperative, called ACEP “a high functioning unit” that helps his co-op with its complex technical challenges.

To promote this research, the U.S. Economic Development Administration selected ACEP and its partners as one of 26 winners of an i6 Challenge Award. The $1 million, three-year award is being used to establish the Alaska Center for Microgrid Technologies Commercialization, which will operate out of ACEP’s PSI Program at UAF.

ACMTC provides streamlined access to the extensive knowledge network of utilities and companies operating in more than 200 remote Alaska communities, as well as providing laboratory time for technology research and development. It also offers testing on equipment such as the solar and fault emulators, which were both funded through the i6 Challenge Award.

The focus of ACMTC is to provide technical and business assistance to industry members to bring their microgrid products or services to market. The first step is to document the critical issues and challenges that industry members and technology innovators can encounter in rural and isolated settings.  Being able to address these issues successfully will allow developers to more effectively deploy their products and services into the Alaska microgrid market.

ADDITIONAL CONTACT: George Roe, gmroe@alaska.edu

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UAF to compete at national steel bridge contest http://news.uaf.edu/uaf-compete-national-steel-bridge-contest/ http://news.uaf.edu/uaf-compete-national-steel-bridge-contest/#respond Tue, 24 May 2016 19:02:21 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65350 Catherine Estus adds the finishing touches to the 2016 steel bridge model during a practice run in the Duckering Building.A team of students from the University of Alaska Fairbanks will compete at a national bridge-building contest on May 27-28 at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.]]> Catherine Estus adds the finishing touches to the 2016 steel bridge model during a practice run in the Duckering Building.

A team of students from the University of Alaska Fairbanks will compete at a national bridge-building contest on May 27-28 at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Catherine Estus adds the finishing touches to the 2016 steel bridge model during a practice run in the Duckering Building.
UAF photo by JR Ancheta
Catherine Estus adds the finishing touches to a steel bridge model during a practice run in the Duckering Building. The UAF Steel Bridge Team will compete at nationals on May 27-28 at Brigham Young University.

The American Society of Civil Engineers hosts the ASCE Steel Bridge Competition each year as a test of skill and knowledge for engineering students. The 10-member UAF Steel Bridge Team earned the right to compete at nationals in early April after winning the Pacific Northwest regional competition at the University of Idaho.

The competition challenges students to develop a strong and efficient bridge design, judging it on criteria that include stiffness, weight and construction speed. The guidelines for the bridges change each year, requiring teams to develop new designs for each competition.

“Everything factors into our overall score,” said team captain Elliott Anderson, a junior civil engineering student. “It’s a balancing act of trying to do these things that all oppose each other.”

Anderson said UAF’s team has worked since September to plan and build its bridge. Since regionals, the team has worked to increase its speed, cutting its construction time roughly in half to about 8 minutes.

Along with Anderson, the team includes Catherine Estus, Wilhelm Muench, Nick Marcello, Scott Taylor, Ryan Burnham, Nathan Barnett, Shane Ohms, Danny Smith and Mayra Cedeno. UAF engineering professor Leroy Hulsey serves as advisor to the team.

It’s the second consecutive trip to nationals for the UAF team, which finished in ninth place last year. UAF won the national competition in 1993.

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Big changes on a big peninsula in Alaska http://news.uaf.edu/big-changes-on-a-big-alaska-peninsula/ http://news.uaf.edu/big-changes-on-a-big-alaska-peninsula/#comments Mon, 23 May 2016 20:03:32 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65328 An image of the Kenai Peninsula on June 15, 2015, acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Aqua satellite. The red box in this cropped image is a wildfire.Larger than West Virginia, the Kenai Peninsula has the best of Alaska: coastal rainforests, two icefields, majestic deepwater fiords and a sapphire river home to the largest king salmon ever caught. It also has some of the best-documented changes of any geographic feature in Alaska, enough that a biologist now sees the peninsula evolving into a human-driven system.]]> An image of the Kenai Peninsula on June 15, 2015, acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Aqua satellite. The red box in this cropped image is a wildfire.

 

This image of the Kenai Peninsula on June 15, 2015, was acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Aqua satellite. The red box in this cropped image denotes a wildfire.
This image of the Kenai Peninsula on June 15, 2015, was acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Aqua satellite. The red box in this cropped image denotes a wildfire.

Larger than West Virginia, the Kenai Peninsula has the best of Alaska: coastal rainforests, two icefields, majestic deepwater fiords and a sapphire river home to the largest king salmon ever caught. It also has some of the best-documented changes of any geographic feature in Alaska, enough that a biologist now sees the peninsula evolving into a human-driven system.

John Morton of the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge recently gave examples of ecological transformations on the Kenai Peninsula. He cited studies by many others in a presentation he gave from his office in Soldotna. Here are some examples:

The Kenai has become a much warmer and drier place in the last 50 years. There has been a 60 percent loss of available water on the peninsula since 1968.

Glaciers on Harding Icefield have shrunk the height of a five-story building in the last 50 years.

In the 1990s, spruce bark beetles that like warm summers killed 30 million spruce trees.

Forestry officials now consider April 1 the start of the Alaska wildfire season after a grassland fire burned on the Kenai in early spring 2005. For years, the start of fire season was May 1.

Where beetles and wildfire have intersected on the southern peninsula, grasslands seem to be replacing stands of spruce. What was forest is now savannah. There is now a 40,000-acre grassland in the Caribou Hills between Homer and Ninilchik.

Forty-seven of 48 streams measured in July 2009 were warm enough (above 55 degrees Fahrenheit) to cause heat stress in salmon.

Bird-watchers have identified 27 new species on the peninsula since 2007. Many species are arriving earlier in spring and migrating out later in fall.

Black spruce and shrubs have begun creeping into peat and sphagnum bogs that have sat unchanged for thousands of years.

Treeline has been advancing uphill at a rate of more than six feet each year in some areas.

Coho salmon are feeding on earthworms that hadn’t existed on the peninsula until people carried them in.

Outside the refuge office in Soldotna, an entomologist caught a cluster fly not found before in Alaska. That type of fly feeds on the larvae of earthworms.

Chinese ring-necked pheasants are surviving on the peninsula after escaping captivity or being released.

Lodgepole pines planted by landowners are thriving hundreds of miles from the Yukon Territory, the farthest north and west natural range of the trees.

“There’s been a real reshuffling by exotic species,” Morton said. “We have this very artificial system that is totally human-driven.”

With all these small changes adding up year by year over the acreage of the Kenai Peninsula, Morton wonders if managers should step in with controlled burns, reforestation, more selective and aggressive management of exotic species and maybe programs to introduce new grazers, like bison or elk. The peninsula now hosts 138 exotic plant types and 30 non-native animal species.

“Should we influence these outcomes?” he said. “Nobody’s steering the ship. Doing nothing is really doing something.”

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2016 Invent Alaska Competition winners announced http://news.uaf.edu/2016-invent-alaska/ http://news.uaf.edu/2016-invent-alaska/#respond Fri, 20 May 2016 22:03:47 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65234 Continue reading 2016 Invent Alaska Competition winners announced ]]>  

<i>UAF photo</i><br /> Winneres of the 2016 Invent Alaska awards gather with Vice Chancellor of Research Larry Hinzman, fifth from right, and Mark Billingsley, Office of Intellectual Property and Commercialization contracts director, third from right. The winners, from left, include Rajive Ganguli, Rob Rember, Simon Filhol, Tathagata Ghosh, Rich Collins, Heidi Rader, Mindy Courter, Robert Coker and James Long.
UAF photo
Winners of the 2016 Invent Alaska awards gather with Vice Chancellor of Research Larry Hinzman, fifth from right, and Mark Billingsley, Office of Intellectual Property and Commercialization contracts director, third from right. The winners, from left, include Rajive Ganguli, Rob Rember, Simon Filhol, Tathagata Ghosh, Rich Collins, Heidi Rader, Mindy Courter, Robert Coker and James Long.

Eight inventors from the University of Alaska Fairbanks community won awards in the 2016 Invent Alaska Competition held by the UAF Office of Intellectual Property and Commercialization.

Vice Chancellor for Research Larry Hinzman announced the winners at a ceremony May 6. The competition was open to UAF students and employees.

The winners were honored for their achievements in technology and research and for their contributions to the local economy and community.

The 2016 Invent Alaska winners are:

  • Robert Coker, faculty member in the Department of Biology and Wildlife and Institute of Arctic Biology, was recognized for research leading to commercialization of Myo-Canine. Myo-Canine is a food product that maintains skeletal muscle while reducing fat in obese animals.
  • Mindy Courter, student in the School of Education, won a student innovation award in social science for her app, “Time of Need,” that is targeted to assist homeless people locate food, shelter and other local resources.Simon Filhol, student in the Department of Geosciences and at the International Arctic Research Center. He won a student innovation award in environmental science for his app, “Data Cache,” which allows researchers to collect real-time data from data loggers.
  • Rajive Ganguli and Tathagata Ghosh, faculty members in the Department of Geological and Mining Engineering, won a faculty innovation award in industrial processes and workforce development for their work on the Dynamic Mill Simulator. It simulates mining operations for managing mines and training mine operators.
  • James Long, staff member at the International Arctic Research Center, won a staff innovation award for extending open-source software for high-performance computers. The SLURM plug-in improves efficiency of cluster computer systems by managing library resources locally in the cluster.
  • Rob Rember, faculty member at the International Arctic Research Center, won a faculty innovation award in scientific instrumentation for his work on the Sea Ice Corer. The Sea Ice Corer is designed to take ice samples without contamination, allowing accurate testing of ice for trace elements.
  • Heidi Rader, staff member with the Cooperative Extension Service, won a staff innovation award in citizen science for her app, “Grow and Tell,” which allows gardeners and farmers to share crop selection and yield information.

“I’m thrilled that the Invent Alaska competition highlighted the depth and diversity at the university,” said OIPC director Richard Collins. “The turnout represents the increasing awareness of innovation at UAF. I look forward to next year.”

OIPC services for UAF researchers include patenting, copyright, non-disclosure agreements, conflict of interest plans and assistance with small business development. Each researcher receives a customized approach to protecting their research.

ADDITIONAL CONTACT: Melissa McCumby, misalley@alaska.edu, 907-474-2605.

ON THE WEB: www.uaf.edu/oipc

 

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UAF names spring 2016 honors students http://news.uaf.edu/spring-2016-honors/ http://news.uaf.edu/spring-2016-honors/#respond Fri, 20 May 2016 17:06:50 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65304 The University of Alaska Fairbanks has announced the students named to the deans’ and chancellor’s lists for the spring 2016 semester. The lists recognize students’ outstanding academic achievements.

Students receiving a 3.9 grade point average or higher are placed on the chancellor’s list, while those receiving a grade point average of between 3.5 and 3.89 are named to the deans’ list.

UAF is a Land, Sea and Space Grant institution. Located 160 miles south of the Arctic Circle, UAF is the leading doctoral-degree-granting institution in the state. Since it was founded in 1917, UAF has been internationally recognized for research relating to the Arctic and subarctic, in areas such as biology, geophysics, engineering, natural resources and global climate change.

NOTE TO EDITORS: Students who have earned academic honors but have requested that their directory information remain confidential may not appear on the public honors list.


Chancellor’s list

Alabama
Zachary D. Theurer Montgomery AL
Alaska
Riley J. Bickford Anchorage AK
Allison A. Brooking Anchorage AK
Michael A. Brush Anchorage AK
Daniel L. Creasy Anchorage AK
Austin D. Dabbs Anchorage AK
Kimberly F. Diamond Anchorage AK
Ingrid R. Dye Anchorage AK
Janelle A. Feller Anchorage AK
Alyssa I. Flynn Anchorage AK
Elan W. Funk Anchorage AK
Robert T. Groeneweg-Sanders Anchorage AK
Kraig J. Hammond Anchorage AK
Bryce A. Hiles Anchorage AK
Paul B. Huske Anchorage AK
Trevor D. Jepsen Anchorage AK
Bryant G. Klug Anchorage AK
Martin J. McKay Anchorage AK
Jonathan P. McMahon Anchorage AK
Anders I. Ogawa Anchorage AK
Meredyth K. Richards Anchorage AK
Dylan N. Sanders Anchorage AK
Hannah T. Short Anchorage AK
Wyatt W. Slater Anchorage AK
Sophia D. Tidler Anchorage AK
Lida I. Zakurdaew Anchorage AK
Candace A. Kruger Anvik AK
Frankie C. Pavilla Atmautluak AK
Martin Dorsey Barrow AK
Katrina J. Watson Barrow AK
Gerald J. Anvil Bethel AK
Ashley D. Johnson Bethel AK
Vicki N. Wiseman Chefornak AK
Miranda L. Thiessen Chickaloon AK
Lisa A. Cogen Chugiak AK
Douglas Keller Chugiak AK
Parker A. Whaley Chugiak AK
Rowan N. McPherson Clear AK
Michael R. Helkenn Copper Center AK
Brian J. Reggiani Cordova AK
Nikolay B. Donets Delta Junction AK
Evelina Savonin Delta Junction AK
Jason M. Treybal Delta Junction AK
Kali A. Striker Denali Park AK
Gabriel Fulton Dillingham AK
Elizabeth A. Himschoot Dillingham AK
Eric D. Bookless Douglas AK
Abigail M. Blackstone Eagle River AK
Moriah M. Hunstiger Eagle River AK
Cody D. Keith Eagle River AK
Erin E. Kitchin Eagle River AK
Gabrielle S. Mordini Eagle River AK
Paulette T. Mordini Eagle River AK
Hannah R. Rowland Eagle River AK
Gina L. Ortner Eielson AFB AK
Ashley L. Simon Eielson AFB AK
Amie Greer Ester AK
Clay S. Allen Fairbanks AK
Melissa B. Allen Fairbanks AK
Brent J. Amundsen Fairbanks AK
Douglas R. Ballard Fairbanks AK
Kasey M. Barnes Fairbanks AK
Keegan W. Bell Fairbanks AK
Lauren V. Berg Fairbanks AK
David S. Best Fairbanks AK
Louise R. Bishop Fairbanks AK
Liam P. Black Fairbanks AK
Matthew J. Blake Fairbanks AK
Kevin D. Blanchard Fairbanks AK
Mackyle A. Bogachoff Fairbanks AK
Tara Bramlett Maricle Fairbanks AK
Mary J. Bruso Fairbanks AK
Jacob Butler Fairbanks AK
Erik R. Carlson Fairbanks AK
Ariana N. Casey Fairbanks AK
Angel S. Catindig Jr Fairbanks AK
Esul P. Chafin Fairbanks AK
Joshua M. Chavez Fairbanks AK
Richard Chen Fairbanks AK
Shayla L. Congleton Fairbanks AK
William L. Czyzewski Fairbanks AK
Michele Dalton Fairbanks AK
Katie A. Damon Fairbanks AK
Josh Dillard Fairbanks AK
Ashley N. Dodds Fairbanks AK
Gabriella M. Draper Fairbanks AK
Steevie L. Erickson Fairbanks AK
Laurin A. Fisher Fairbanks AK
Millicent D. Flannel Fairbanks AK
Sunnie M. Gebhardt Fairbanks AK
Matthew A. Gross Fairbanks AK
Jackson P. Harrison Fairbanks AK
Benjamin Hedges Fairbanks AK
Courtney M. Hill Fairbanks AK
Heather H. Hinzman Fairbanks AK
Huckleberry J. Hopper Fairbanks AK
Orion K. Hutchin Fairbanks AK
Christopher A. Irwin Fairbanks AK
Kinzea G. Jones Fairbanks AK
Kimberly M. Kelley Fairbanks AK
Scotty M. Kenmonth Fairbanks AK
Kayla S. Kerstetter Fairbanks AK
Kevin Krugle Fairbanks AK
Kira E. Leonard Fairbanks AK
Anqi Liu Fairbanks AK
KaCee F. Llewelyn Fairbanks AK
Melissa R. Logan Fairbanks AK
Andrea N. Lucas Fairbanks AK
Jessica V. Lyga-Nguyen Fairbanks AK
Emily G. McClelland Fairbanks AK
Erin L. McGroarty Fairbanks AK
Tara M. McGrogan Fairbanks AK
Sean A. Merriman Fairbanks AK
Aleksandra Milanovic Fairbanks AK
Teresa M. Miller Fairbanks AK
Devin S. Millington Fairbanks AK
Elias J. Mitchell Fairbanks AK
Emmeline A. Mitchell Fairbanks AK
Jasmine R. Mitchell Fairbanks AK
Alece C. Moreno Fairbanks AK
Zachary R. Morris Fairbanks AK
Sara M. Mustard Fairbanks AK
Tomas A. Nichols Fairbanks AK
Michael A. Nolan Fairbanks AK
Jessica K. Obermiller Fairbanks AK
Emma C. OConnor Fairbanks AK
Christa A. Ogawa Fairbanks AK
Meagan V. Olsen Fairbanks AK
Julia M. Olson Fairbanks AK
Mary E. Perreault Fairbanks AK
Sarah E. Pherson Fairbanks AK
Tyler Poe Fairbanks AK
Olivia R. Rhines Fairbanks AK
Rebecca C. Ridley Fairbanks AK
Annmarie J. Robinson Fairbanks AK
Chelsea B. Roehl Fairbanks AK
Lindsey S. Sam Fairbanks AK
Aspen L. Severns Fairbanks AK
Zachary S. Sherman Fairbanks AK
Lacy F. Simko Fairbanks AK
Doreen N. Simmonds Fairbanks AK
Mary Jo G. Skaggs Fairbanks AK
Jason L. Slats Fairbanks AK
Bekah L. Taylor Fairbanks AK
Jennifer M. Taylor Fairbanks AK
Sabine R. Todd Fairbanks AK
Montana L. Troyer Fairbanks AK
Christopher A. Tuckness Fairbanks AK
Amber J. Vaska Fairbanks AK
Alyssa N. Weaver Fairbanks AK
Levi R. Weis Fairbanks AK
Derek B. Wells Fairbanks AK
Grace K. West Fairbanks AK
Mary B. Young Fairbanks AK
Nancy L. Burkett Fort Richardson AK
Sarah Bolt Fort Wainwright AK
Nicole Brookshire Fort Wainwright AK
Sidney E. Houck Fort Wainwright AK
Sarah A. Manriquez-Trujillo Fort Wainwright AK
Natalie Rettberg Fort Wainwright AK
Chase R. Delatush Girdwood AK
Scott S. Hansen Haines AK
Mylinda S. Cizmowski Healy AK
Liam M. Juhl Healy AK
Mary A. Killian Healy AK
Malia M. Walters Healy AK
Lydia E. Arndt Homer AK
Patrick J. Nestor Homer AK
John P. Shank Homer AK
Kyle J. Wentz Homer AK
Kannon C. Lee Igiugig AK
Andrea J. Hughes JBER AK
Dominique D. Brinson Juneau AK
Stephen E. Ringle Juneau AK
Adrienne L. Sypeck Juneau AK
Taylor D. Vidic Juneau AK
Tyler P. Boyd Kenai AK
Mandee L. Cogley Kenai AK
Ashley A. Pruitt Kenai AK
Kenley D. Scarlett Kenai AK
Ashley R. Thornton Kenai AK
Ryker L. Dial Ketchikan AK
Hailey D. Davis Kodiak AK
Daniel C. Nero Kodiak AK
Mark Anthony E. Velasco Kodiak AK
Corey E. Joseph Kwigillingok AK
Eli D. Ward Nikiski AK
Jacalyn E. Morgan Nome AK
Eric J. Petersen Nome AK
Jamie M. Arnold North Pole AK
Cassandra M. Ball North Pole AK
Casey P. Boyle North Pole AK
Erica N. Cassino North Pole AK
Samantha N. Davis North Pole AK
Teresa L. Faucette North Pole AK
Danielle A. Fausnaugh North Pole AK
Jessica T. Garvin North Pole AK
Robyn M. Heineken North Pole AK
Michael R. High North Pole AK
Nicholas A. Hinz North Pole AK
Sarah E. Howard North Pole AK
Aharon D. Hughes North Pole AK
Angelica P. Kougl North Pole AK
Michael J. Moore North Pole AK
Erica L. Nardella North Pole AK
Devante J. Owens North Pole AK
Jonilee A. Polanco North Pole AK
Jay A. Samuel North Pole AK
Emily J. Scheff North Pole AK
Kelly J. Schmitz North Pole AK
Shellie T. Severa North Pole AK
Christopher A. Starkey North Pole AK
Ashley M. Swedberg North Pole AK
Matthew A. Tallman North Pole AK
Sarah K. Webb North Pole AK
Adam J. Weis North Pole AK
Michael S. Westmoreland North Pole AK
Howard R. Sam Northway AK
Jacklynn B. Burbank Palmer AK
Lyon R. Kopsack Palmer AK
Tobin M. Sworts Palmer AK
Aimee B. Roesel Petersburg AK
Lonny D. Strunk Quinhagak AK
Melanie A. Fredericks Saint Marys AK
Andrea Hood Seward AK
Ashley M. Von Borstel Seward AK
Ryan S. Adickes Sitka AK
Owen R. Fulton Sitka AK
Tad J. Nelson Sitka AK
Chaya E. Pike Sitka AK
Tristan S. Van Cise Sitka AK
Savannah B. Anchinges Soldotna AK
Matthew R. Goffena Soldotna AK
Kathrine A. Quelland Soldotna AK
Travis M. Semmens Soldotna AK
Marina L. Wallace Soldotna AK
Cassandra E. Kendall Sterling AK
Laura E. Stahl Talkeetna AK
Selina J. Sam Tanana AK
Claire S. Burnham Tok AK
Alyeska E. Daniels Unalakleet AK
Katie M. Daniels Unalakleet AK
Marcus B. Pedro Unalakleet AK
Svea J. Southall Unalakleet AK
Katrina L. Bishop Valdez AK
Shania A. Fifarek Valdez AK
Carl J. Hedman Valdez AK
Justin W. Long Valdez AK
Marian M. Wamsley Valdez AK
Kasie J. Baker Wasilla AK
Daniel Baklanov Wasilla AK
Kailei D. Bryant Wasilla AK
Nicolette M. Edwards Wasilla AK
Mary L. Grubbs Wasilla AK
Jonah P. Jeffries Wasilla AK
Peter M. Kelly Wasilla AK
Renee S. Miranda Wasilla AK
Bryan S. Sand Wasilla AK
Arizona
Cassidy M. Kelly Flagstaff AZ
Sarah H. Sefton Green Valley AZ
California
Sutthada B. Kulavitaya Daly City CA
Angelica P. Noa Fairfield CA
Sarah E. Jones Sunnyvale CA
Rebecca L. Callahan Turlock CA
Colorado
Charity N. Harrison Colorado Springs CO
Amy E. Cross Fort Collins CO
Jordan D. Wilson Henderson CO
Timothy K. Sherry Littleton CO
Florida
Reyce C. Bogardus Englewood FL
Hawaii
Keanu M. Paikai Honolulu HI
Jeremy D. Thomas Kailua HI
Idaho
Hayley B. Weatherstone Boise ID
Andrea L. Junier Meridian ID
Dakota S. Grende Mountain Home AFB ID
Sara J. Hoback Nampa ID
Illinois
Victoria Morales Mundelein IL
Ashlyn B. Warning New Salem IL
Riley Q. Gorski Spring Grove IL
Iowa
Joshua C. Dutler Ida Grove IA
Kansas
Clare K. Lorsung Junction City KS
Maine
Derek D. Gamage Sabattus ME
Massachusetts
Alexis M. Nardone Winchester MA
Minnesota
Luke A. Carlson Rochester MN
Montana
Jessica L. Herzog Butte MT
Koya S. Truax Kalispell MT
Nevada
Terricka L. Snowden North Las Vegas NV
New York
Sean M. Pence Natural Bridge NY
North Carolina
Noelle E. Hallan Durham NC
North Dakota
Alexander T. King Fargo ND
Ohio
Mitchell J. Slife Aurora OH
Kristen N. Puckett Lucasville OH
Oregon
Sara M. Hensel Lake Oswego OR
Courtney L. Magelssen Lebanon OR
Tennessee
Natasha Pierce La Follette TN
Texas
Annyssa M. Interrante Cleburne TX
Michael S. Sybert Killeen TX
Alexis M. Peppin New Braunfels TX
Virginia
Marlaina S. McElheny Bristol VA
Ruth J. Bett Lynchburg VA
Aidan Myers Lynchburg VA
Washington
Mark G. Jackson Bellingham WA
Michael A. Robbins Edwall WA
Jenny M. Dale Monroe WA
Jesse I. Kaczmarski Olympia WA
Lindsey Johnson Pullman WA
Madeleine A. Davis Puyallup WA
West Virginia
Matthew S. Sponaugle Eleanor WV
Wyoming
Kelly Y. Slaven Laramie WY
Nathan H. Strong Lingle WY
International
Rodrigo Da Silva Prado Barao de Antonina Brazil
Catriona M. Willoughby Edinburgh Scotland
Jessica F. Greenhalgh Glasgow Scotland
Ritika Saxena Melbourne Australia
Felipe A. Schiquetti Pouso Redondo Brazil
Michael Fehrenbach Sankt Maergen Germany
Asuka Suwa Shimolgusa Japan
Martina Himma Tartu Estonia
Amir Raz Timrat Israel
Vebjoern J. Melum Tromso Norway
Hansae Song Uiwang, Gyeonggi-do South Korea
Laetitia Riboud Vourles France
Eric J. Marlow Winnweiler Germany

Dean’s list

Alabama
Christian M. Philbrook Enterprise AL
Alaska
Jessica M. Adler Anchorage AK
Katherine R. Aikens Anchorage AK
Darling J. Anderson Anchorage AK
Stephanie M. Baer Anchorage AK
Adam C. Becia Anchorage AK
Lilly A. Bee Anchorage AK
Kate J. Benfield Anchorage AK
Kenton A. Berg Anchorage AK
Karen L. Biondich Anchorage AK
Kamilah M. Bolling Anchorage AK
Brigit C. Bryner Anchorage AK
James K. Choi Anchorage AK
James Christy Anchorage AK
Ashley S. Clifford Anchorage AK
Grant K. Cummings Anchorage AK
Benjamin P. Curtiss Anchorage AK
Allison M. Ducker Anchorage AK
Christina M. Edwin Anchorage AK
Taylor F. Elkins Anchorage AK
Ryan C. Goldfuss Anchorage AK
Dalton R. Gregg Anchorage AK
Jordyn C. High Anchorage AK
Jason Hsi Anchorage AK
Jesse M. Keller Anchorage AK
Jonathan Kimzey Anchorage AK
Jack J. Kissler Anchorage AK
Evan G. Kressly Anchorage AK
Riley B. Landeis Anchorage AK
Lutfi Lena Anchorage AK
Cory M. McDonald Anchorage AK
Monica L. Mikes Anchorage AK
Tate E. Miles Anchorage AK
Bayli O. Mohl Anchorage AK
Monique R. Mojica Anchorage AK
Kristina M. Moore Anchorage AK
Raven S. Mustafoski Anchorage AK
Sarah A. Riopelle Anchorage AK
Zoe E. Rodes Anchorage AK
Daniel B. Sandstrom Anchorage AK
Isabella R. Sellers Anchorage AK
Rilen C. Skieens Anchorage AK
Nathan A. Stephens Anchorage AK
Junehyuk C. Suenram Anchorage AK
Seiji A. Takagi Anchorage AK
Conner M. Truskowski Anchorage AK
Alexander J. Warthen Anchorage AK
Raymond A. Wessels Anchorage AK
Patrick C. Bruner Anchorage AK
Carol D. Keel Anderson AK
Katie A. Roseberry Barrow AK
Maryanna J. Jimmie Bethel AK
Joshua Klejka Bethel AK
Samual B. Green Big Lake AK
Clarence M. Smyth Big Lake AK
Shealyn K. Golden Chugiak AK
Deanna D. Knutson Copper Center AK
Samantha J. Knutson Copper Center AK
Daniel Posey Copper Center AK
Cassi N. Williams Craig AK
Jay R. Byam Delta Junction AK
Cheyenne A. Corty Delta Junction AK
Elizabeth A. Jepsen Delta Junction AK
David S. Tatarenko Delta Junction AK
Pedro Gonzalez Jr Dillingham AK
Pamela C. Murphy Dillingham AK
Thor A. Austin Eagle River AK
Sean V. Braendel Eagle River AK
Robert L. Colles Eagle River AK
Audrey L. Daigger Eagle River AK
Alyssa L. Dordan Eagle River AK
Andrew K. Eklund Eagle River AK
Jacob D. Fairbanks Eagle River AK
Jacob T. Klaameyer Eagle River AK
Isaac J. Lammers Eagle River AK
Elleot R. Lamothe Eagle River AK
Robert W. Monfore Eagle River AK
Jackson C. Page Eagle River AK
Connor H. Sperry Eagle River AK
Andre J. White Eagle River AK
Raenessa Deniece G. Cyb Eielson AFB AK
Latoya F. Myers Elmendorf AFB AK
Irene L. Anderson Ester AK
Emily A. Ahern Fairbanks AK
Harrison W. Alford Fairbanks AK
Thomas H. Antal Fairbanks AK
Kaitlynn A. Austin Fairbanks AK
Michael S. Bardsley Fairbanks AK
Mary Barnard Fairbanks AK
Kathryn E. Baum Fairbanks AK
Angel A. Bayya Fairbanks AK
Abigail A. Bazan Fairbanks AK
Emma C. Benjamin Fairbanks AK
Denae A. Benson Fairbanks AK
Ethan J. Berkeland Fairbanks AK
Rayne B. Blair Fairbanks AK
Danielle S. Bohan Fairbanks AK
Abigail J. Brice Fairbanks AK
Blaze W. Brooks Fairbanks AK
Marcus D. Brown Fairbanks AK
Rachel E. Burchard Fairbanks AK
Gerrit R. Butler Fairbanks AK
Brandaise C. Callahan Fairbanks AK
Shane Callahan Fairbanks AK
Brett D. Carlson Fairbanks AK
Amanda A. Casterline Fairbanks AK
Justin D. Church Fairbanks AK
Karen N. Cockerham Fairbanks AK
Benjamin J. Coffroth Fairbanks AK
Brandal N. Crenshaw Fairbanks AK
Elizabeth M. D’Amour Fairbanks AK
Wesley G. Darling Fairbanks AK
SarahKate I. Darter Fairbanks AK
Corey M. Day Fairbanks AK
Daniella DeMarre Fairbanks AK
Timothy Demarre Fairbanks AK
Ray J. DeWilde Fairbanks AK
Katrina R. Dowell Fairbanks AK
Destiny E. Dowling Fairbanks AK
Dakota B. Dragomir Fairbanks AK
Erika G. Dunkle Fairbanks AK
Olena A. Ellis Fairbanks AK
Ariel M. Ellison Fairbanks AK
Olivia L. Esera Fairbanks AK
Claire J. Everts Fairbanks AK
William E. Floyd Fairbanks AK
Joshua A. Fontana Fairbanks AK
Mackenzie C. Fulmer Fairbanks AK
Isaac-James Z. Gage Fairbanks AK
Kennedy R. George-Silva Fairbanks AK
Philip J. Glowa Fairbanks AK
Zachary D. Goeden Fairbanks AK
Elijah J. Graham Fairbanks AK
Jesse A. Gray Fairbanks AK
Mikayla R. Grunin Fairbanks AK
Abram G. Haas Fairbanks AK
Kiana A. Hamlin Fairbanks AK
Mikayla J. Hamlin Fairbanks AK
Dain M. Harmon Fairbanks AK
Kathryn L. Harrod Fairbanks AK
Sarah A. Hartman Fairbanks AK
Austin A. Head Fairbanks AK
Cassidy S. Heaton Fairbanks AK
Dawson A. Hebard Fairbanks AK
Mariah Henderson Fairbanks AK
Rachel L. Higgins Fairbanks AK
Victoria S. Hollister Fairbanks AK
Naomi R. Hutchens Fairbanks AK
Josephine L. Hytry Fairbanks AK
Michael O. Jayne Fairbanks AK
Bret L. Johnson Fairbanks AK
Samantha L. Kelley Fairbanks AK
Stephen W. Ketzler Fairbanks AK
Joseph H. Kim Fairbanks AK
Jennifer L. Kirksey Fairbanks AK
Sean N. Kramer Fairbanks AK
Tiana J. Kraus Fairbanks AK
Meryem A. Kugzruk Fairbanks AK
Brennan T. LaBuda Fairbanks AK
Nettie O. Larson Fairbanks AK
Patrick L. Lassell Fairbanks AK
Ethan J. Lauesen Fairbanks AK
Alexander W. Lease Fairbanks AK
Brigitta D. Lease Fairbanks AK
Sarah S. Lilly Fairbanks AK
Alan L. Lipka Fairbanks AK
Kirsten L. Loaiza Fairbanks AK
Deanna F. Lowden Fairbanks AK
Rochelle F. Lucero Fairbanks AK
Christa L. Lynch Fairbanks AK
Austin T. Mahler Fairbanks AK
Patricia M. Manning Fairbanks AK
Jeffrey W. Maring Fairbanks AK
Kyle J. May Fairbanks AK
Ryan P. Mayo Fairbanks AK
Randee L. Metayer Fairbanks AK
Corcoran C. Mikol Fairbanks AK
Kyle P. Milke Fairbanks AK
Robert C. Morton Fairbanks AK
Alexandra G. Nelson Fairbanks AK
Dorothy R. O’Donnell Fairbanks AK
Jason S. Pace Fairbanks AK
Mackenzie R. Parrott Fairbanks AK
Tanya E. Paul Fairbanks AK
Danielle M. Penaranda Fairbanks AK
Mason E. Pfrimmer Fairbanks AK
Cassidy H. Phillips Fairbanks AK
Viktorija Podlutskaya Fairbanks AK
Molly A. Putman Fairbanks AK
Mark Christopher M. Ramos Fairbanks AK
Kelin M. Reitano Fairbanks AK
Diane J. Rider Fairbanks AK
Richard F. Rifley II Fairbanks AK
Luke R. Rogers Fairbanks AK
Victoria M. Ross Fairbanks AK
Ryan G. Rostad Fairbanks AK
Angelina N. Rotermund Fairbanks AK
Bryan C. Sauer Fairbanks AK
Tristan N. Sayre Fairbanks AK
Nicole F. Schreder Fairbanks AK
Jaimy A. Schwarber Fairbanks AK
Nina K. Sikes Fairbanks AK
Sun Young Sim Fairbanks AK
Courtney N. Snodgress Fairbanks AK
Sierra N. Sommer Fairbanks AK
Martin A. Sparks Fairbanks AK
Mackenzie R. Stamey Fairbanks AK
Kaitlyn A. Stansberry Fairbanks AK
Kaylee A. Stickel Fairbanks AK
Celina R. Swerdfeger Fairbanks AK
Jennifer L. Sybert Fairbanks AK
Stephanie A. Sztajer Fairbanks AK
Kristin C. Taylor Fairbanks AK
Steven A. Temple Fairbanks AK
Kirielle E. Thompson Fairbanks AK
Noah A. Tsigonis Fairbanks AK
Jordan Valentine Fairbanks AK
Treat J. Van Flein-Hage Fairbanks AK
Angelina Vanlandingham Fairbanks AK
Heather A. Vickers Fairbanks AK
Gerrit W. Vreeman Fairbanks AK
Natalie E. Wagner Fairbanks AK
Zachary D. Wall Fairbanks AK
Kenedie J. Wassmann Fairbanks AK
Mary L. Webb Fairbanks AK
Stefawna R. Welch Fairbanks AK
Amanda J. Welton Fairbanks AK
Josiah M. Whelchel Fairbanks AK
Joshua Whitney Fairbanks AK
Kristill L. Williams Fairbanks AK
Luke A. Williams Fairbanks AK
Sarah M. Williamson Fairbanks AK
Casey R. Winkelman Fairbanks AK
Charles K. Woodward Fairbanks AK
Jesse G. Zhang Fairbanks AK
Aaron R. Ward Fort Richardson AK
Gabriella H. Allen Fort Wainwright AK
Danielle L. Dallas Fort Wainwright AK
Hannah Delair Fort Wainwright AK
Stephanie A. Fleck Fort Wainwright AK
Samuel Grenon Fort Wainwright AK
Brianna M. Hernandez Fort Wainwright AK
Eboni D. Lee Fort Wainwright AK
Marissa J. Lizarraga Fort Wainwright AK
Tierza N. Paige Fort Wainwright AK
Tyler S. Ridgeway Fort Wainwright AK
Kelsey R. Rohren Fort Wainwright AK
Keshya M. Scott Fort Wainwright AK
Lawrence A. Springer Fort Wainwright AK
Kayley M. Wilson Fort Wainwright AK
Kristen L. Wyatt Fort Wainwright AK
Victoria S. Baalam Fort Yukon AK
Brooke L. Wright Galena AK
Gwendolyn M. Quigley Girdwood AK
Carlene A. Crow Glennallen AK
David L. Rowland Glennallen AK
Keziah B. Anderson Healy AK
Wylie C. Donich Homer AK
Benjamin D. Fetterhoff Homer AK
Cody C. Gaines Homer AK
Leah Lansdowne Homer AK
Colin J. Latimer Homer AK
Emily M. Paulino Homer AK
Drew L. Turner Homer AK
Paula R. Hill Hooper Bay AK
Jennie Lane Houston AK
LeAnn D. Bifelt Huslia AK
Andrew S. Glynn JBER AK
Jason R. Sebring JBER AK
Jason M. Beedle Juneau AK
Sean M. Boddy Juneau AK
James C. Gilchrest Juneau AK
Quincy A. Judson Juneau AK
Victoria R. Leque Juneau AK
Cecily R. Schubert Juneau AK
Trevor W. Short Juneau AK
Claressa L. Ullmayer Juneau AK
Toni A. Weber Juneau AK
Phillip D. White Juneau AK
Marshall T. Willems Juneau AK
Timotheen A. Charles Kasigluk AK
Spencer L. Egbert Kasilof AK
Kaillee R. Skjold Kasilof AK
Alexandria J. Bergholtz Kenai AK
Georgeanna L. Heaverley Kenai AK
Josiah D. Martin Kenai AK
Caitlin B. Miller Kenai AK
Eric L. Collins II Ketchikan AK
Jillianne E. Fazakerley Ketchikan AK
Keenan C. Sanderson Ketchikan AK
Rosemary K. Svenson Ketchikan AK
William W. Craske Klawock AK
Emily S. Arnick Kodiak AK
Pearson R. Brodie Kodiak AK
Maria J. Jacobson Panozo Kodiak AK
Deirdre W. Creed Kotzebue AK
Solomon H. Shindler Kotzebue AK
David J. Smith Kotzebue AK
Shirley Sam Koyukuk AK
Laura R. Kromrey Moose Pass AK
Lindsey L. Kromrey Moose Pass AK
Charlotte Peterson Nenana AK
Brittany N. Sexton Nikiski AK
Ajiel Mae F. Basmayor Ninilchik AK
Louise L. Bauman Nome AK
Sara M. Leckband Nome AK
Nicholas K. Morgan Nome AK
Michaela J. Allen North Pole AK
David Atkins North Pole AK
Micah A. Bador North Pole AK
Timothy R. Ballard North Pole AK
Lane K. Bonham North Pole AK
Ian J. Brazier North Pole AK
Jason T. Bright North Pole AK
Joseph W. Brunsvold North Pole AK
Lindsey Budge North Pole AK
Ryan E. Burgess North Pole AK
Anastasia G. Butler North Pole AK
Brittany A. Corbin North Pole AK
Sheridan N. Culver North Pole AK
Luke J. Demientieff North Pole AK
Austin A. Dunham North Pole AK
Katherine A. Dykes North Pole AK
Amee B. Dzimitrowicz North Pole AK
Seth T. Garman North Pole AK
Emily L. Gearhardt North Pole AK
Michael A. Geyer North Pole AK
Hannah B. Hampton North Pole AK
Elizabeth J. Hartman North Pole AK
Geneva D. Holderby North Pole AK
Taylar M. Holt North Pole AK
Rorey J. Hughes North Pole AK
Steven D. Hutcherson North Pole AK
Charles O. Marshall North Pole AK
Angelina A. Martushoff North Pole AK
Caitlin B. Mattingly North Pole AK
Sara M. McBride North Pole AK
Jacob P. McKenna North Pole AK
MacKenzie E. Mechling North Pole AK
Doug P. Montini North Pole AK
T’yaira R. Moore North Pole AK
Jacob D. Peeples North Pole AK
Rocky L. Powers North pole AK
Randy J. Pruitt North Pole AK
Cecilia M. Sauer North pole AK
Donna Skorulski North Pole AK
Megan Sliger North Pole AK
Megan D. Smith North Pole AK
Mark A. Stoller North Pole AK
Annalisa N. Taylor North Pole AK
Matthew A. Walker North Pole AK
Seth J. Walker North Pole AK
Madeline T. Wenzlick North Pole AK
Bridget F. Wilkerson North Pole AK
Allen M. Williams North Pole AK
Ashland M. Williams North Pole AK
Jacob C. Williams North Pole AK
Clinton A. Wyatt North Pole AK
Kathryne L. Mitchell North Pole AK
Katarina E. Godden Palmer AK
Tracie J. Haan Palmer AK
Cecilia A. Hull Palmer AK
Joshua J. Klina Palmer AK
Sandra R. Kolberg Palmer AK
Nicole J. Lindsay Palmer AK
Paige M. Martin Palmer AK
Dillon M. Mills Palmer AK
Harrison K. Mulligan Palmer AK
Christopher W. Smith Palmer AK
Ella N. Van Siegman Palmer AK
Chelsea D. Wells Palmer AK
Benjamin S. Lane Point Hope AK
Lynn R. Armstrong Salcha AK
Linda Darnell Salcha AK
Frances M. Johnson Salcha AK
Annalee V. Tidwell Salcha AK
Marceline V. Lee Selawik AK
Nathan C. Feemster Seward AK
Herbert Newberg Shishmaref AK
Elliott R. Anderson Sitka AK
Evan S. McArthur Sitka AK
Trevor R. Schoening Sitka AK
Trace A. Braxling Soldotna AK
Taylor T. Hanley Soldotna AK
Gwendolyn I. Nelson Soldotna AK
AdriAnna F. Newberry Soldotna AK
Christopher J. Nichol Soldotna AK
Nicholas L. Truesdell Soldotna AK
Tiffany M. Gerwig Sutton AK
Billyann R. Monrean Tanana AK
Nicholas O. Wirak Tanana AK
Sherry L. Dompierre Tok AK
John W. Folan Tok AK
Sage E. Tixier Tok AK
Baxter W. Bond Tununak AK
Theresa J. Hooper Tununak AK
Brittany A. Sarren Unalakleet AK
Noah A. Betzen Unalaska AK
Taylor M. Davis Valdez AK
Kiefer M. Groeneveld Valdez AK
Ashley A. Harshell Valdez AK
Caitlyn N. Larcom Valdez AK
Trevor J. Norris Valdez AK
Kayla R. Ridderbush Valdez AK
Christopher M. Campbell Wasilla AK
Charles D. Coisman Wasilla AK
Sam B. Erie Wasilla AK
Kyle A. Hinds Wasilla AK
Alexandra Jenner Wasilla AK
Connor M. Mattson Wasilla AK
William S. Middleton Wasilla AK
Naomi K. Mitchell Wasilla AK
Luke M. Schruf Wasilla AK
Sara L. Wagner Wasilla AK
Sarah I. Warhus Wasilla AK
Nicole A. Hawkes Wasilla AK
Samantha J. Pershing Willow AK
Korovin J. Ellis Wrangell AK
Arizona
Linnea Doumas Tucson AZ
California
Ashton D. Edwards Compton CA
Jonathon E. Thompson El Segundo CA
Jocelyn A. Brady Folsom CA
Sagen R. Maddalena Groveland CA
Max C. Mckernan Livermore CA
Avery S. Navarette Los Angeles CA
Daniel Blair Madrid Nice CA
Lauren G. Saffer Palos Verdes Peninsu CA
Raymundo Lopez Porterville CA
Savanah H. Hendrick Simi Valley CA
Collin J. Lasley Ventura CA
Angela Perry Wilmington CA
Colorado
Tyler Ludwig Bayfield CO
Tiara M. Gill Colorado Springs CO
Mary H. Mercier Commerce City CO
David B. Reynolds Denver CO
Connecticut
Colin H. Field Barkhamsted CT
Katrina J. Kuharich Litchfield CT
Florida
Naomi E. Jones Jacksonville FL
Felicity C. Testa Jacksonville FL
Georgia
Kristen L. Rhode Swainsboro GA
Hawaii
Richard L. Sheridan Ewa Beach HI
Idaho
Shayleen A. Nadon Boise ID
Joshua G. Pharris Boise ID
Noah C. Hamm Eagle ID
Illinois
David J. Harris Des Plaines IL
Forrest J. Smoes Mahomet IL
Indiana
Jennifer L. Nelson Columbus IN
Maryland
Michael S. Dugan Annapolis MD
Tallin S. Walker Silver Spring MD
Shannon Scott Upper Marlboro MD
Massachusetts
Allison A. Rothwell Belchertown MA
Jessica Hien Malden MA
Michigan
Denise Bechard Ann Arbor MI
Aaron Van Der Male Holland MI
Minnesota
Gunnar W. Ostman Mountain Iron MN
Peter C. Krieger Oakdale MN
Joshua C. Erickson Roseau MN
Missouri
Lauren E. Whitt Hamilton MO
Montana
Austyn A. Grubb Great Falls MT
Neveda
William G. Crumpacker Las Vegas NV
Sarah M. Day Las Vegas NV
New Hampshire
Eric W. Van Dam Durham NH
Jennifer R. Johnston Merrimack NH
New Jersey
Laurice Riley Jersey City NJ
Kathryn S. Reichert Oxford NJ
New Mexico
Morgan L. Bradley Artesia NM
Evelyn Yazzie Mountainair NM
New York
Monroe K. Morris Cuba NY
Patrick A. Smith Lodi NY
North Dakota
Carl Wahlin Bismarck ND
Frank J. Sikich Grand Forks ND
Oregon
Jordan M. Ferland Beavercreek OR
Colin B. MacDonald Gresham OR
Samantha R. Harthun Oregon City OR
Michael S. Lorain Philomath OR
Caitlin G. Barron Sandy OR
Jenny King Sisters OR
Pennsylvania
Victoria A. Moloney Irwin PA
Joel M. Stone Josephine PA
South Carolina
Patrick E. Robinson-Cortez Aiken SC
Tennessee
Magen C. Morris Nashville TN
Texas
James . Doss Chatfield TX
George E. Cooper Grapevine TX
Matthew D. Halfacre Lakehills TX
Utah
Tara K. Ellis Provo UT
Amelia M. Anderson Salt Lake City UT
Virginia
Stephen C. Comtois Alexandria VA
Jason O. Fegurgur Ft. Lee VA
Washington
Joshua R. McNeal Amboy WA
David Tise Bellevue WA
Alina C. Fairbanks Bellingham WA
Nora L. Gyswyt Buckley WA
Scott S. Leorna Camano Island WA
Colin H. Michael Everett WA
Courtney D. Antilla Gig Harbor WA
Chad M. Staley Kennewick WA
Amber M. Corrigan Lakewood WA
Kristoffer N. Nystrom Olympia WA
Kelly N. McCartney Port Orchard WA
Christin O. Martin Rainier WA
Caleb P. Hyldahl Seattle WA
Tucker M. Cooper Snohomish WA
Andrew Montoya Spokane WA
B’Elanna N. Rhodehamel Stevenson WA
Tiffany Olson Sultan WA
Wisconsin
Haley K. Reutter Arkdale WI
Kendra J. Holdorf Ellsworth WI
Nichole M. Bathe Fitchburg WI
Canada
Nikolas B. Koberstein Barrhead AB, Canada
Davis W. Jones St Albert AB, Canada
Brandon M. Morley Burnaby BC, Canada
Carolyn Lennie Inuvik NW, Canada
International
Kaito Kobayashi Aisai, Suecho Japan
Paul S. Langley Brighton England
Joshua C. Purba Cimahi Indonesia
Mi Chin Yi Inchoen South Korea
In Ho Yeo Inchon South Korea
Jan Cech Jilemnice Czech Republic
Noriyasu Niibu Kumamoto-shi Japan
Sanne Karlsen Kvaloya Norway
Ann Cathrin Uhl Muehlenbach Germany
Emiliana Tonini Neuchatel Switzerland
Emily K. Smith Okinawa Japan
Kathryn L. Pound Pahiatua New Zealand
Badri Aabour Rive de gier France
Erika Nishiyama Sapporo City Japan
Hazuki Fukuda Siki-shi Japan
Gracelynn J. Wiseman APO AE
Mylissa E. Maclin APO AP
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http://news.uaf.edu/spring-2016-honors/feed/ 0
Alaska Sea Grant chooses three new state fellows http://news.uaf.edu/alaska-sea-grant-chooses-three-new-state-fellows/ http://news.uaf.edu/alaska-sea-grant-chooses-three-new-state-fellows/#respond Thu, 19 May 2016 23:28:25 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65221 Alaska Sea Grant Fellow Sarah Apsens
Photo by Deborah Mercy
Alaska Sea Grant Fellow Sarah Apsens.

Three new Alaska Sea Grant state fellows will gain a year of professional experience in marine policy beginning this summer. This year’s fellows — Sarah Apsens, Jane Sullivan and Jennifer Marsh — are all graduate students in the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences.

Sarah Apsens is close to completing a master’s degree in fisheries. She has been placed with the National Park Service in Anchorage, potentially looking at whitefish habitat or assessing oil spill impacts on intertidal communities. Her work will include data collection, statistics and writing.

“I know by working with NPS that I will get exposure to a wide array of habitat types and management issues,” Apsens said. “I am interested to see how NPS utilizes science to preserve and manage the parks’ many natural resources and educate the public.”

Alaska Sea Grant Fellow Jane Sullivan. Photo by Deborah Mercy.
Photo by Deborah Mercy
Alaska Sea Grant Fellow Jane Sullivan.

Jane Sullivan, also near completion of her master’s degree in fisheries, will work with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sustainable Fisheries Division in Juneau. Her projects may include improving sampling design and protocol in the fisheries observer program or best practices for incorporating observer data into stock assessments.

“I see myself working at the interface between fisheries science and management,” Sullivan said. “My long-term goal is to work with a state or federal agency in Alaska, and I hope to use my background in quantitative fisheries to generate tools that inform policy makers.”

Jennifer Marsh is pursuing a doctorate in fisheries. She will be working on several projects with NOAA Fisheries (National Marine Fisheries Service) in the Habitat Conservation Division in Anchorage, including updating the essential fish habitat section for the Arctic Fisheries Management Plan.

Marsh is particularly enthusiastic about that project. “One of the three potential target species identified in the fisheries management plan is Arctic cod, which is the focal species of my dissertation research,” she said.

Alaska Sea Grant Fellow Jennifer Marsh. Photo by Deborah Mercy.
Photo by Deborah Mercy
Alaska Sea Grant Fellow Jennifer Marsh.

“This year we were lucky to have six opportunities for the three fellows to choose from,” said Paula Cullenberg, Alaska Sea Grant director. “NMFS agreed to fully fund their second fellow, enabling us to stretch our dollars to support three fellows. I was impressed with the caliber of the applicants this year and all of the hosts noted their strong credentials.”

Sullivan said she is excited about the mentorship available through the fellowship, and Marsh looks forward to expanding her technical skills and learning more about the fisheries management process. Apsens said, “The Alaska Sea Grant fellowship seems like an excellent opportunity to get my foot in the door with an organization and gain valuable work experience.”

The fellowship, launched in 2015, is geared toward graduate students interested in planning and implementing marine and coastal policies in Alaska. The program matches fellows with hosts in state or federal agencies in Alaska for a 12-month professional experience. First-year fellows Matt Robinson, at the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, and Marysia Szymkowiak, with NOAA Fisheries, will complete their fellowships this summer.

Alaska Sea Grant shares the cost of the stipend with agency hosts. Recruitment for next year’s hosts will begin in fall 2016. Prospective fellows can apply in February 2017.

ON THE WEB: Visit the Alaska Sea Grant Fellowship Program webpage.

ADDITIONAL CONTACTS: Paula Cullenberg, Alaska Sea Grant director, paula.cullenberg@alaska.edu, 907-274-9692

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UA president announces interim chancellor search process http://news.uaf.edu/ua-president-announces-interim-chancellor-search-process/ http://news.uaf.edu/ua-president-announces-interim-chancellor-search-process/#respond Wed, 18 May 2016 01:20:23 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65198 Following last week’s announcement by University of Alaska President Jim Johnsen that he would not to fill the chancellor position at the University of Alaska Fairbanks on a permanent basis, recruitment details for an interim chancellor have been released.

Johnsen made the decision based on the looming budget reductions from the state and the potential changes in the university’s organizational structure.

The recruitment will be limited to current or former UAF employees and the appointment will be for a minimum of one year. Details of the recruitment are outlined at http://www.alaska.edu/pres/uaf-interim-chancellor-se/. Qualified individuals should send a one-page letter of interest along with a current CV to ua‑hrcomp@alaska.edu no later than Friday, May 27. Three finalists will be selected by June 6 and posted for university and community comments prior to June 20. President Johnsen will announce his selection no later than June 30.

“As this recruitment gets underway,” he said, “I want to assure you of my commitment to UAF’s strength today and in the future. UAF figures prominently in Strategic Pathways as our lead research university and it will continue to play a major role in providing Alaskans access to the opportunities that come from higher education, preparing Alaskans for high demand jobs, continuing to lead the world in Arctic research, and contributing to the development and diversification of Alaska’s economy.”

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Orca skeleton project nears goal at Bristol Bay Campus http://news.uaf.edu/orca-skeleton-project-nears-goal-bristol-bay-campus/ http://news.uaf.edu/orca-skeleton-project-nears-goal-bristol-bay-campus/#respond Wed, 18 May 2016 00:46:59 +0000 http://news.uaf.edu/?p=65128 UAF photo by Todd Paris
Dillingham High School student Max Bennett displays a bone and an exact duplicate from a fetus taken from the womb of a pregnant Orca that washed ashore near Dillingham in Alaska's Bristol Bay a few years ago. Bennett has been earning high school credit through a cooperative agreement with UAF's Bristol Bay Campus to scan the whale's bones with a 3-D scanner and recreate its skeleton using a 3-D printer.Nearly five years after a pregnant orca whale washed ashore near Dillingham, a project at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Bristol Bay Campus is close to offering an unprecedented view of its fetus.]]> UAF photo by Todd Paris
Dillingham High School student Max Bennett displays a bone and an exact duplicate from a fetus taken from the womb of a pregnant Orca that washed ashore near Dillingham in Alaska's Bristol Bay a few years ago. Bennett has been earning high school credit through a cooperative agreement with UAF's Bristol Bay Campus to scan the whale's bones with a 3-D scanner and recreate its skeleton using a 3-D printer.

Nearly five years after a pregnant orca whale washed ashore near Dillingham, a project at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Bristol Bay Campus is close to offering an unprecedented view of its fetus.

UAF photo by Todd Paris Dillingham High School student Max Bennett displays a bone and an exact duplicate from a fetus taken from the womb of a pregnant Orca that washed ashore near Dillingham in Alaska's Bristol Bay a few years ago. Bennett has been earning high school credit through a cooperative agreement with UAF's Bristol Bay Campus to scan the whale's bones with a 3-D scanner and recreate its skeleton using a 3-D printer.
UAF photo by Todd Paris
Dillingham High School student Max Bennett displays a bone and an exact duplicate from a fetus taken from the womb of a pregnant orca that washed ashore near Dillingham in Alaska’s Bristol Bay in 2011.

After hours spent meticulously cleaning, sorting and documenting hundreds of bones, university officials and Dillingham High School students are nearing their goal of reproducing the fetus’ skeleton with the help of a 3-D scanner and printer.

The long and unlikely project started in October 2011 when three killer whales  swam up the Nushagak River near Dillingham, became stranded and died.

One of the whales immediately became a source of fascination for residents of the Southwest Alaska community. A local tribal organization, Nunamta Alukestai, coordinated a hasty plan to butcher and store the skeleton.

A necropsy determined the orca was pregnant. The soft tissue of the nearly full-term, 6-foot-long fetus was too fragile to be preserved, but its bones could be stored for future study.

“At the very beginning, when we were cutting up the mother whale, everyone was aware of the carcass,” said Clint Reigh, a UAF academic advisor who worked as a high school teacher in Dillingham at the time. “Anyone who could handle the smell was invited to come and help.”

Reconstructing the fetus skeleton grew into a long-term partnership with the Bristol Bay Campus in 2012. Combining disciplines as diverse as biology, computer studies and art, the project provided a bridge between the Dillingham campus and local high school students seeking course credits and jobs.

Bristol Bay Campus photo A group at Bristol Bay Campus, from left, Darren Napoli, Nathan Coutsoubos, Marshal Johnson, Christopher Marks, Mariah Dray and Eli Hunt, display the orca fetus bones they've cataloged in fall 2014.
Bristol Bay Campus photo
A group at Bristol Bay Campus — from left, Darren Napoli, Nathan Coutsoubos, Marshal Johnson, Christopher Marks, Mariah Dray and Eli Hunt — display the orca fetus bones they’ve cataloged in fall 2014.

Reigh, Dillingham High School teacher Nathan Coutsoubos and Kimberly Williams, executive director of Nunamta Aulukestai, have spent the past five years working together to push the project forward.

“It fit into a couple of our objectives — working with the high school and setting some career pathways,” said Bristol Bay Campus Director Deborah McLean. “It fits in with art, scientific illustration, and it just kind of all worked with the programs that we wanted to offer.”

Assembling an orca fetus, however, presented a unique set of challenges. Reigh couldn’t find another example of a reconstructed killer whale fetus skeleton anywhere else in the world.

Students practiced with the bones of an otter, fox and lynx — stripping them down, taking the skeletons apart and then reassembling them. Lee Post, a Homer resident and skeletal expert known as “Bone Man,” lent his knowledge of techniques for articulating bones.

Many of the bones in the fetus hadn’t entirely fused when it was found, which made the skeleton much more complicated to assemble. In some cases, an unformed vertebrae is made up of five separate bones. The skull alone consists of roughly 30 extremely fragile pieces. In all, Reigh said, they range from about the size of a pencil eraser to a large boomerang-shaped bone.

Bristol Bay Campus photo When a killer whale washed ashore near Dillingham in 2011, an effort to preserve the skeleton of its fetus became a long-running project at UAF's Bristol Bay Campus.
Bristol Bay Campus photo
When a killer whale washed ashore near Dillingham in 2011, an effort to preserve the skeleton of its fetus became a long-running project at UAF’s Bristol Bay Campus.

Each bone requires a unique scanning technique. Some, which are the shape of a small cookie, take two simple 20-minute scans before they’re reproduced in plastic by the 3-D printer. Other bones have passageways or holes in them, requiring images from many different angles.

“At that point, it becomes almost an art in acquiring the scan,” Reigh said.

Reigh said all of the bones could be printed out as early as this month. At that point, teams will work to piece together the skeleton with the fabricated plastic pieces, which are much more durable than the fragile bones.

“The bones are very porous and very fragile,” he said. “I think it’s in our best interest to practice on the plastic bones before we try to assemble the fetal skeleton.”

Once the model is complete, Bristol Bay Campus officials hope to work with researchers who want the rare opportunity to check out an orca fetus skeleton. But in a journey that has often involved the unexpected, McLean said they’re open to new directions.

“We’re always going, ‘What’s next?’” she said with a laugh. “This is experimental for us.”

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