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The 2012 Dry Creek Fire and the resulting smoke plume, as seen from UAF’s West Ridge. Photo courtesy Geophysical Institute

University of Alaska Fairbanks atmospheric scientists are developing ways to help forecast air quality in areas downwind from wildfires. Nicole Mölders and her colleagues used computer models derived from well-studied past wildfires to assess the likely effectiveness of two different data-collection tools during a real fire: satellite-borne instruments and drones.

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Anyone walking in the University of Alaska Fairbanks woods this spring might notice white plastic buckets hanging from trees. The buckets, which collect birch sap, are emptied daily, and in some cases, more frequently. “If it’s a real gusher, it’s twice a day,” said Jan Dawe, director of the university’s OneTree Alaska program.

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Representatives from state agencies and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension Service will offer two presentations about arsenic on April 28. The first will be at 5:30 p.m. in Schaible Auditorium on the UAF campus. The second will be at 7 p.m. in the Ken Kunkel Community Center in Goldstream Valley.

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Amir Allam

  NEAR MILLER CREEK — Crouching amid scratchy spruce branches and surrounded by feet of snow, Amir Allam jabs half-frozen soil with the spiky base of a white cylinder. The seismologist twists the 6-pound seismometer to orient it northward. Then he clicks a cable to a magnetic connection on top. “Starting operation,” says a tinny … Continue reading Carpeting the Denali Fault with earthquake sensors

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The University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension Service is surveying owners of small businesses and startups in Alaska. Kathryn Dodge, Extension’s economic development specialist, said the goal is help determine what types of technical assistance would help businesses be more successful.

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Greg Breed photo
An anicia checkerspot (Euphydryas anicia) on pebbles near the shore of Kluane Lake, in Yukon, Canada.

University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist Greg Breed studies why wild animals go where they go and live where they live. He and his students follow butterflies, grey and Weddell seals, Cassin’s auklets and golden eagles, in addition to killer whales and narwhals.

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